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Cheerful blooms of Narrowleafed Mule’s Ear (Wyethia angustifolia). One of 100+ species of Pacific Northwest native plants available at Sparrowhawk Native Plants, Native Plant Nursery in Portland, Oregon.
Narrow-leaved Mule's Ear
Bloom of Narrowleafed Mule’s Ear (Wyethia angustifolia). One of 100+ species of Pacific Northwest native plants available at Sparrowhawk Native Plants, Native Plant Nursery in Portland, Oregon.
Long leaf of Narrowleafed Mule’s Ear (Wyethia angustifolia). One of 100+ species of Pacific Northwest native plants available at Sparrowhawk Native Plants, Native Plant Nursery in Portland, Oregon.
Growth habit of Narrowleafed Mule’s Ear (Wyethia angustifolia) in a partially shaded spot. One of 100+ species of Pacific Northwest native plants available at Sparrowhawk Native Plants, Native Plant Nursery in Portland, Oregon.

Narrow-leaved Mule's Ear

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$9.95
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Wyethia angustifolia

Narrow-leaved mule’s ear is a drought-tolerant wildflower that can be used easily in almost any sunny native garden, such as meadowscapes or open woodland gardens. It sports an oversized and showy yellow flower, very similar to a sunflower and equally adored by pollinators. 

  • Plant type/canopy layer: deciduous, perennial, herbaceous plant 
  • Size at maturity: 1-2' tall, 1-3' wide
  • Light requirements: full sun
  • Moisture requirements: moist to dry soil, ideally well-drained
  • Bloom time: May - July
  • Growth rate/ease: medium to slow growth rate, easy to grow
  • Wildlife support: flowers attract and provide nectar to adult butterflies, bees and other insect pollinators; overall plant is a caterpillar host plant and larval food source for native butterflies and moths
  • Native habitat/range: common in grasslands, meadows and open hillsides from sea level to 2200m, from southern Washington, especially throughout the Columbia River Gorge, as well as the Willamette Valley and Central California. Portland Plant List - no (though there are occurrences in Multnomah County).  
  • Special features & uses: landscape uses include pollinator gardens and wildflower meadowscapes

Gardening with Narrow-leaved Mule’s Ear: Plant in full sun areas with sandy, loamy soils that are well-drained to see this lovely wildflower thrive. Its lanceolate leaves start lush in the early season, then turn crispy brown as the season progresses. So we recommend interplanting with other bunchgrasses and wild flowers that fill in and easily cover the dry leaves. Like many native perennials, it dies back entirely, then returns the following spring. It is also slow-growing, but will spread via rhizomes over many years.

Photo Credits 1, 3, 5: Nikkie West, Sparrowhawk Native Plants

Photo Credit 2: "Wyethia angustifolia" by mypubliclands is licensed under CC BY 2.0 

Photo Credit 4: Seven Oaks Native Nursery