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FAQs

How do I order and pick-up my plants?

Check out our How It Works page to find out!  This page has info on how and when to order and pick-up your plants.

I submitted an order, but now I want to add even more plants to my order, how do I do that?

Excellent, we are happy to help you do this!  Please email customerservice@sparrowhawknativeplants.com rather than placing a second order. Placing a second order will require you to select a new check-out date/time, which causes confusion down the road when you have two pick-up dates/times.  

When you email, please include your name, order #, and the qty and size of the additional plants you want to order.  We will add these to your order and send you a link to pay for the additional plants.

How can I get notified about future sales?

Sign up on our Email List

Where are you located?

Sparrowhawk does not have a brick-and-mortar location. Instead, our customers pre-order plants online and we distribute them at community locations based in neighborhoods. This streamlined model provides a fun and easy online shopping experience at unbeatable prices - and builds community at neighborhood events. 

Can Sparrowhawk Native Plants help me get my Backyard Habitat Program Certification?

Yes!  The Backyard Habitat Certification Program advocates for native plants that are on the Portland Plant List (considered native to Portland).  The majority of the plants we sell are on the Portland Plant List. We do have a few exceptions in Spring 2021, including Thrift Seapink, Showy Milkweed, Creeping Oregon Grape, Coyote Bush, White Leaf Manzanita, Barrett's Beardtongue, Golden Currant, Cusick's Checkermallow, Giant Red Paintbrush, Douglas Meadowfoam and Common Madia.  While these plants are not on the PPL, they are still native to Oregon and support our local birds and pollinators.

Wow - nearly 100 species?! How do I decide which native plants to buy for my yard?

First, decide where you would like to add a native garden to your yard to welcome local birds and pollinators, and then think about how much sun or shade that area gets and how dry or wet the soil seems.  Then, filter the plants by those conditions to find the plants that will likely work best for your new Native Garden.

To benefit wildlife, think about your native garden as a community of plants that live together (like in nature) versus individual stand-alone plants. Planting species in multiples helps make sure there are enough blooms of that plant to attract pollinators like hummingbirds, butterflies and bumblebees.

Ok, now I'm home, how do I plant my new plants?

First, water the plant thoroughly in its pot and let it sit overnight or at least a few hours so that its roots have a chance to soak up the water. 

Dig the hole twice as wide as the pot and loosen the soil around the edges. 

Gently pull the plant out of it's pot. Look for roots that are circling and pull them out so they point outwards away from the stem.

Mix some of the soil from the pot with the existing soil and create a little hill at the bottom of the hole.  Set the new plant on the hill and arrange the roots heading down away from the stem.

Gently fill in the hole with remaining dirt and water deeply all around. Add a top layer of mulch, which could be wood chips, compost and/or fallen leaves.